There is no place I `d rather call home than AFRICA.

In all the places of the world.

Washington and it’s beauty

New York and it’s splendour.

In all the kingdoms of the world,

there is no place I would rather call home than Africa.

 

From the hills of Eastern South Africa,

through the miellie farms of Bloemfontien

to  Stellenbosch and its vineyards.

There is no place I would rather call home.

 

From Dakar to Cape Town

I am moved your beauty.

My ink runs dry describing your beauty.

there is no place I would rather call home.

 

Over Botswana and its diamonds

Johannesburg and its gold,

I am aware you are too rich to be poor,

you have enough for our needs not our greed.

 

My beloved Africa,

your wealth in not underground but on top of it.

Its not your gold,

its not your diamonds

its your children.

 

Glorious Rainbow Nation

come paint our world colorful.

Let the ground that nurtured me smile when I touch it.

 In all the great Nations of the world,

there is no place I `d rather call home than AFRICA.

Empathy is not merely an emotional connection

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Empathy is without a doubt what connects us as human-beings; but in health care it’s much more. Empathy is not merely an emotional connection; it’s much deeper than that. It is about letting people know that they matter and that we care about their well-being. This emotional connection allows us to be mindful of what our patients are experiencing and to help understand their lives and context.

Everyone has a story and this is my story: Last semester I was placed Brooklyn Chest hospital. My very first patient was terminally ill, there was not much I could do for her. But for some unknown reason I enjoyed spending time in her bedside listening to some of her stories about when she was young. She liked making lousy jokes that where not even funny. One day she told me the saddest story I`ve ever heard. She told me something that happened a few years ago. She told me that she was raped and her husband would allow strange man to rape her in exchange for money. This was the saddest thing I ever heard. I shared this with my senior clinicians but still I could not stop thinking about what happened to my patient. Nothing distresses me like driving my scooter, and this particular day as I was driving my scooter back to hostel I collided with a taxi, apparently I have been driving too fast. I am sharing this story to outline the importance of keeping a professional distance with your patients. Keeping a professional distance in patient’s problems does not mean you are cold and timid, it only means you are protecting yourself and loved ones.

On the other flip side of the coin should my patient have not told me her story I would have not understood why she does not like it when I passively flex her knees. She would have not got help from the social workers of the hospital. This experience taught me that there are lives behind the patients, lives interrupted and lives on hold. Understanding the how and why and what patients are feeling will allow for the clinician-patient relationship to flourish, making better outcomes possible. It is important to understand that patients are more than just our diagnosis, they are people who have been through a lot of pain and they deserve our empathy, they deserve our care.

On my last day on Brooklyn Chest  Hospital I went to say bye to my patients, and just before I left my patients` room, she pulls  me with the corner of my  apron and she say “Thank you, I never  felt so listened to…” I quickly knew that if you cannot care about the people you are serving, you will probably not succeed in this field.  You will be caring for (not only) the sick and injured but interacting with their worried family members on a daily basis.  You need to able to put yourself in their shoes and empathize with their situation if you are to truly provide high quality of care.  However, empathy is different from sympathy and pity.  The best clinicians are able to empathize but not internalize others’ emotional and physical pain.

Empathy in healthcare

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Empathy is without a doubt what connects us as human-beings; but in health care it’s much more. Empathy is not merely an emotional connection; it’s much deeper than that. It is about letting people know that they matter and that we care about their well-being. This emotional connection allows us to be mindful of what our patients are experiencing and to help understand their lives and context.

Everyone has a story and this is my story: Last semester I was placed at TB hospital in Brooklyn Cape Town. My very first patient was terminally ill, there was not much I could do for her. But for some unknown reason I enjoyed spending time in her bedside listening to some of her stories about when she was young. She liked making lousy jokes that where not even funny. One day she told me the saddest story I`ve ever heard. She told me something that happened a few years ago. She told me that she was raped and her husband would allow strange man to rape her in exchange for money. This was the saddest thing I ever heard. I shared this with my senior clinicians but still I could not stop thinking about what happened to my patient. Nothing distresses me like driving my scooter, and this particular day as I was driving my scooter back to hostel I collided with a taxi, apparently I have been driving too fast. I am sharing this story to outline the importance of keeping a professional distance with your patients. Keeping a professional distance in patient’s problems does not mean you are cold and timid, it only means you are protecting yourself and loved ones.

On the other flip side of the coin should my patient have not told me her story I would have not understood why she does not like it when I passively flex her knees. She would have not got help from the social workers of the hospital. This experience taught me that there are lives behind the patients, lives interrupted and lives on hold. Understanding the how and why and what patients are feeling will allow for the clinician-patient relationship to flourish, making better outcomes possible. It is important to understand that patients are more than just our diagnosis, they are people who have been through a lot of pain and they deserve our empathy, they deserve our care.

On my last day on Brooklyn Chest  Hospital I went to say bye to my patients, and just before I left my patients` room, she pulls  me with the corner of my  apron and she say “Thank you, I never  felt so listened to…” I quickly knew that if you cannot care about the people you are serving, you will probably not succeed in this field.  You will be caring for (not only) the sick and injured but interacting with their worried family members on a daily basis.  You need to able to put yourself in their shoes and empathize with their situation if you are to truly provide high quality of care.  However, empathy is different from sympathy and pity.  The best clinicians are able to empathize but not internalize others’ emotional and physical pain.

Hello Ethics class

I find it fit to briefly introduce myself. My name is Cecil Lwana I am from a small village just outside King Williams Town in the Eastern Cape of South Africa. Where I come from  men do not study physiotherapy , we study law and politics, I am an exception to this trend for one simple reason…I was born in a family that had a  child with Cerebral Palsy, my sister required the art of physical therapy for a number of reasons but because this is a rare art to have in the Eastern Cape she could not get it. I got into physiotherapy because I wanted to help those like my late sister and their families, I got into physiotherapy because I want to relieve some of the hopelessness that families who have children suffering from chronic illnesses, I believe physiotherapy will help me do just that.

I am currently doing my summer internship in Washington DC for a company called John Snow Inc. this is an international medical consultancy group that works with developing countries like South Africa, I have been part of the Supply Chain Management group that procures ARV`s and lab equipment in Botswana and Zambia.

I worked also in the DELIEVER PROJECT together with  Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, where we were responsible for sharing the latest resources and research with the governments of developing countries (this was my first assignment) I had to publish these case study.

I love to ask questions, I have the ability to divorce my thoughts and think about why I think what I think, this is why I think I will enjoy this online class. You might have noticed that I have used my old existing blog, I have done this for few reasons which I think are important when you look at issues of ethics, and these is my personal experiences as a young South Africa, I have done this so you can understand a little bit about my personal life and how it influences my ethical stance. I am deeply grateful to also the international community that will be partaking in these discussions and I hope we can learn a lot from each other.

picking up the pieces of my old life

When I was growing up I heard stories of men who changed the course of medicine, I read of stories about Vevian Thomas an uneducated black american who hardly finished high schoo, he got a job to clean dog poops for Dr Blalock who was using these dogs for his medical research, he was the first person to operate on the heart which was an ancient taboo to even touch the heart at the time. Mr Thomas later pionered a procedure that treated Blue Baby Syndrome

I later heard even much awesome stories about men like Ben Carson who was raised by a single mother who could not read or write and worked as domestic worker, Ben become the first person to do hemispherctomy (romoving half of the brain and the person survived)

both these stories have one thing in common, these men have did their training at Johns Hopkins University.

Today I am going to Johns Hopkins you have no idea whats happening in my Mind. When I was growing up in Mdingi I had no clue back then I would see the places they saw, sit where they sat, see the books they read.

How do I go back to South Africa and still be the same boy who used to sit behind my grandmothers rondervel and still be the same boy I was before these trip? My village is still the same, nothing has changed, my grandmother rondervel is still there and it still has a nice shade, but I felll like the enviroment might be still be the same but I am not, I am a changed man now. My previous hole is to small, i can not fit in it anymore, and quite frankly I do not want to fit in to my old life.

A lot has happened, I will never be the same again.

Creativity is overratted

Creativity is overrated, it is funny how we are always expected to create “new things, the next big thing, a maters piece” out of thin air, People are not that creative honestly, every idea is birthed by previous ideas. We modify on old opinions to make them more factual and much better.

There is nothing new under the sun, everything that is, was, and everything that was will be, just look at how fashion always re-surfaces after ages of laying dormant. We should not aspire to magically create new ideas, but rather modify on existing ideas to make them better and more efficient.Starting from the time of gramma-phones, telephone to cellphones, these are not new ideas but modifications and improvements to old existing ideas.

New ideas are accidental, just think how Issac Newton came up with the Universal Gravitational Law… when an apple accidentally landed of his head. I am tempted to believe that the next great idea will not necessarily sprout out of thin-air, it will be innovation that modifies an existing idea or product to make it more efficient and better. Creativity is not a talent, its a way of producing quality works.However we can get away without creative creations but our lives would be boring and stagnant.